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Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] kazeyumi at The Philippines Passes a Cybercrime Prevention Act that Makes SOPA Look Reasonable
The dark days of SOPA and PIPA are behind the US, at least temporarily as copyright tycoons reground and restrategize, attempting to come up with measures that don’t cause the entire internet to shut down in protest.

But one country has already moved ahead with similar legislation. The government of the Philippines has passed the Cybercrime Prevention Act, which on the surface, as usual, sounds perfectly well-intentioned. But when you read the actual contents of what’s been deemed “cybercrime,” SOPA’s proposed censorship sounds downright lax by comparison.

Yes, there’s the usual hacking, cracking, identity theft and spamming, which most of us can agree should be illegal. But there’s also cybersex, pornography, file-sharing (SOPA’s main target) and the most controversial provision, online libel.

Now, as someone who has been the target of many a vicious attack from commenters or forum posters, I can understand frustration with the nature of online anonymous criticism. But to actually try to make such a thing illegal? You wade into dangerous waters that anything resembling freedom of speech will likely drown in. And that’s overlooking the free speech implications trampled by banning pornography and file-sharing as well, two provisions getting less attention due to the severity of the libel section.

Via CBS, a senator who opposed the bill explains its potential ramifications:

“If you click ‘like,’ you can be sued, and if you share, you can also be sued,” said Sen. Teofisto Guingona III, one of the lawmakers who voted against the passage of the law.

“Even Mark Zuckerberg can be charged with cyber-libel,” the senator said.

The provision, according to Guingona, is so broad and vague that it’s not even clear who should be liable for a given statement online. And if you’re found guilty, get ready to spend up to 12 years in prison.

Guingona poses the question, who exactly is libel for the libel? Is it the person who made the statements? Anyone who reblogged or retweeted them? The website on which the comments were made? Anyone who commented in assent or even clicked ‘like’? The way the law is worded, the Filipino police could actually charge you with simply criticizing them or the government in a way they deem “malicious,” a word very much open to interpretation.
One of the two Senators who inserted the libel provision, Vincente Sotto III, stands by it.

“Yes, I did it. I inserted the provision on libel. Because I believe in it and I don’t think there’s any additional harm.”


Again, much like SOPA, these are lawmakers who don’t understand the true implications of the law on the technology they’re attempting to regulate. Or maybe they do, in this case. Sotto recently came under fire online for plagiarizing speeches from an American blogger and Robert F. Kennedy which he used to rail against a controversial reproductive health bill.

On social media sites like Reddit, young Filipinos are lamenting the seemingly backwards nature of their government’s recent policies, decrying that they were able to pass a law like this one heavily censoring the internet, but not the aforementioned legislation to teach sex education and give out birth control in schools.

Opponents of SOPA and PIPA should stand up to web tyranny everywhere, and when a supposedly free country institutes censorship practices like that of China and Iran, something is very wrong with that picture. Despite huge protests against the law, the government, as of yet, shows no sign of backing down.

Once again we see a mix of ignorance to technology and the desire to exert further control over a population. Neither is pretty, and neither has any place in a good government.

Source.

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Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] gothickangel92 at ACCESS NOW: Declaration of Internet Freedom
After signing petitions against ACTA/SOPA etc I was sent an e-mail by Access today:

This just in -- the European Parliament has voted down ACTA! Congratulations to you and all the other individuals, organizations, and communities who have fought so hard to defeat this!

This is a huge victory, but the fight doesn’t end here. What we need to do now is focus on reforming these broken laws and promote a culture that is conducive to creativity, free expression, and an open internet, and we invite you to be a part of that conversation.

This week, Access and over 100 other organizations joined together to sign the Declaration of Internet Freedom. It seeks to unite users, industry, and governments against threats to a free and open internet through five guiding principles that emphasize transparency, privacy, free expression, and open dialogue around the future of the internet.

Click here to learn more about the Declaration and become a part of the movement for positive change that’s reshaping the way decision makers approach internet regulation.

This Declaration can help ensure your privacy is protected, your internet stays safe from censorship, and your right to internet access can't be denied. Through this process we can build the safeguards we need to make sure our open internet is never closed -- whether it be by big businesses trying to fatten their bottom line, governments trying to surveil and silence their citizens, or any other enemy to internet freedom.

Join the conversation and make sure our internet stays just as it should -- open and free.

Thanks,
The Access Team


Access is an international NGO that promotes open access to the internet as a means to free, full and safe participation in society and the realization of human rights

You can also sign the petition there: https://www.accessnow.org/page/s/internetdeclaration

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Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] cestlavieminako at It Never Ends...
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] fma245 at It Never Ends...
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] karadin at It Never Ends...
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] rii_no_ame at It Never Ends...

Here's their next move: The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, or CISPA, would obliterate any semblance of online privacy in the United States.

And CISPA would provide a victory for content owners who were shell-shocked by the unprecedented outpouring of activism in opposition to SOPA and Internet censorship.

The House of Representatives is planning to take up CISPA later this month. Click here to ask your lawmakers to oppose it.

SOPA was pushed as a remedy to the supposed economic threat of online piracy -- but economic fear-mongering didn't quite do the trick.

So those concerned about copyright are engaging in sleight of hand, appending their legislation to a bill that most Americans will assume is about keeping them safe from bad guys.

This so-called cyber security bill aims to prevent theft of "government information" and "intellectual property" and could let ISPs block your access to websites -- or the whole Internet.

Don't let them push this back-door SOPA. Click here to demand that your lawmakers oppose CISPA.

CISPA also encourages companies to share information about you with the government and other corporations.

That data could then be used for just about anything -- from prosecuting crimes to ad placements.

And perhaps worst of all, CISPA supercedes all other online privacy protections.

Please click here to urge your lawmakers to oppose CISPA when it comes up for a vote this month.

Thanks for fighting for the Internet.

-Demand Progress

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Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] cestlavieminako at All U.S. Internet Providers will be policing downloads by July 12, 2012
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] fma245 at All U.S. Internet Providers will be policing downloads by July 12, 2012
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] sparkywolf at All U.S. Internet Providers will be policing downloads by July 12, 2012
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] adrian_and_sela and [livejournal.com profile] torchic44

All U.S. Internet Providers will be policing downloads by July 12, 2012
Seriously. WHAT THE FLYING FUCK WORLD.

"File-sharers, beware: By July 12, major US Internet service providers (ISPs) will voluntarily begin serving as copyright police for the entertainment industry, according to Cary Sherman, chief executive of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). The so-called “six-strikes” plan is said to be one of the most effective anti-piracy efforts ever established in the US."

The article goes on to give details. After six notices, internet providers will decide to throttle a person's internet speed, or cut it off altogether. I don't know if they will crack down on torrents only, or if it is up to the internet provider. I get the sense it is up to the internet provider. So some people could get away with downloading non torrents, while others might get their internet service cut off. I urge you to click it and read, as we all know people who download.

No more downloading eps of your favorite shows for vidding, gifs, or fanfiction art. No more downloading screencaps possibly. I'm so sorry my friends. I don't even know if BT Guard will work to protect you, but I would google it if I were you. It is a professional service that supposedly can protect you from the invasive eyes of your internet provider.

Just, my friends, please make each other aware. Please be aware of the date JULY 12TH. Mark your calendar and double check with your internet provider by then. If you start receiving notices of downloaded activity, this is why. And your internet service could be throttled or cut off.

Fox News confirms this:
http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/03/17/us-isps-become-copyright-cops-starting-july-12/

Youtube video explaining this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5OG0R-yS-c



ETA: Petition for RIAA and the Obama Administration: Stop ISPs from launching a massive copyright spying scheme this July 12th


Come on, folks. Sign this, share this, kill this dead. This is ridiculous, and you cannot tell me that this isn't a blatant invasion of privacy.
tilmon: (Default)
Thought this was important enough that I wanted to share it:

Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] gothickangel92 at Democracy: The Maltese Way
From the Times of Malta:

Joseph Muscat said today that the prime minister should have halted the ratification of ACTA, as other countries had done.

Referring to Dr Gonzi's statement yesterday afternoon, Dr Gonzi said that was a statement of convenience, not conviction. He had rushed into signing ACTA behind everybody's back. The socialist and liberal MEPs had been consistently against ACTA in the European Parliament, while the Popular Party, of which the PN formed part, was in favour.

The least that Dr Gonzi could have done yesterday, Dr Muscat said, was to halt ratification, as other countries had done.

But Dr Gonzi had decided that the agreement should stay - effectively ignoring the protest of the morning. He however spoke yesterday of a new law on new civil rights on access to the Internet.

One had to see what Bill the government would come up with, and whether he would have a majority in parliament to make it law, Dr Muscat said.

Dr Gonzi was the least one to speak on civil rights - one only needed to remember the divorce debate where he even voted against divorce in parliament after the people voted in favour in a referendum.

If ACTA was approved by the European Parliament and came for ratification before the Maltese parliament, the Labour Opposition would vote against, Dr Muscat insisted.


And the new bill? (independent)

Amid the controversy surrounding the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), Prime Minister Lawrence Gonzi said yesterday afternoon that he will be proposing a law that would safeguard “four new civil rights” – that of unhindered access to the internet, the right to information and freedom of expression, and the right to decide what information to exchange on the internet.

Giving a brief statement (without taking questions from journalists) at Castille yesterday afternoon, in what appeared to be a knee-jerk reaction to the anti-ACTA protest held in the morning (see separate story on page 3), the Prime Minister said: “The government believes in four civil rights that are new in the circumstances of the modern society we’re living in. These rights are recognised on a practical level, but we feel that we should consolidate them in a law.”

He referred to the ACTA treaty very briefly towards the end of his statement, saying that the government is in favour of proposals aimed at safeguarding artists’ and authors’ rights. Creativity deserves legal protection, but other rights cannot be overlooked. The government is not in favour of any measure that would hinder freedom of expression, said Dr Gonzi.

He said a Bill proposing the introduction of the new civil rights related to the use of the Internet will be presented in the coming days.


So basically he ignored the ACTA march/protest... Oh did I also tell you that the march was broken up here after an hour by the police? Freedom? What freedom?

tilmon: (Default)
Thought this was important enough that I wanted to share it:

Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] gothickangel92 at Democracy: The Maltese Way
From the Times of Malta:

Joseph Muscat said today that the prime minister should have halted the ratification of ACTA, as other countries had done.

Referring to Dr Gonzi's statement yesterday afternoon, Dr Gonzi said that was a statement of convenience, not conviction. He had rushed into signing ACTA behind everybody's back. The socialist and liberal MEPs had been consistently against ACTA in the European Parliament, while the Popular Party, of which the PN formed part, was in favour.

The least that Dr Gonzi could have done yesterday, Dr Muscat said, was to halt ratification, as other countries had done.

But Dr Gonzi had decided that the agreement should stay - effectively ignoring the protest of the morning. He however spoke yesterday of a new law on new civil rights on access to the Internet.

One had to see what Bill the government would come up with, and whether he would have a majority in parliament to make it law, Dr Muscat said.

Dr Gonzi was the least one to speak on civil rights - one only needed to remember the divorce debate where he even voted against divorce in parliament after the people voted in favour in a referendum.

If ACTA was approved by the European Parliament and came for ratification before the Maltese parliament, the Labour Opposition would vote against, Dr Muscat insisted.


And the new bill? (independent)

Amid the controversy surrounding the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), Prime Minister Lawrence Gonzi said yesterday afternoon that he will be proposing a law that would safeguard “four new civil rights” – that of unhindered access to the internet, the right to information and freedom of expression, and the right to decide what information to exchange on the internet.

Giving a brief statement (without taking questions from journalists) at Castille yesterday afternoon, in what appeared to be a knee-jerk reaction to the anti-ACTA protest held in the morning (see separate story on page 3), the Prime Minister said: “The government believes in four civil rights that are new in the circumstances of the modern society we’re living in. These rights are recognised on a practical level, but we feel that we should consolidate them in a law.”

He referred to the ACTA treaty very briefly towards the end of his statement, saying that the government is in favour of proposals aimed at safeguarding artists’ and authors’ rights. Creativity deserves legal protection, but other rights cannot be overlooked. The government is not in favour of any measure that would hinder freedom of expression, said Dr Gonzi.

He said a Bill proposing the introduction of the new civil rights related to the use of the Internet will be presented in the coming days.


So basically he ignored the ACTA march/protest... Oh did I also tell you that the march was broken up here after an hour by the police? Freedom? What freedom?

tilmon: (Default)
Well, maybe not all. But he does show us an interesting glimpse into the history of copyright in the US.

Ever since the SOPA/PIPA blackout last month — which I am pleased to report performed precisely as designed; score one for democracy! — I’ve been consumed with curiosity about the precedent for both this type of lawmaking and this type of protest.

Read all about it!  )
tilmon: (Default)
Well, maybe not all. But he does show us an interesting glimpse into the history of copyright in the US.

Ever since the SOPA/PIPA blackout last month — which I am pleased to report performed precisely as designed; score one for democracy! — I’ve been consumed with curiosity about the precedent for both this type of lawmaking and this type of protest.

Read all about it!  )
tilmon: (Default)


If you live in the EU, be sure to add your voice to the protest on Saturday! The world is depending on you!
tilmon: (Default)


If you live in the EU, be sure to add your voice to the protest on Saturday! The world is depending on you!
tilmon: (Default)
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] cestlavieminako at European LJ folks, take note of areas where you can protest ACTA on the 11th!
With an incredible showing of power and belief, over 300,000 people in 72 hours called on the European Parliament to reject the rights-threatening international copyright treaty, ACTA. We’ve shone a bright light on the countries that signed this secretly negotiated agreement – but the fight to save the internet is far from over.
ACTA still needs to be approved by the European Parliament, and if it goes down there, the agreement will effectively be dead in the water. Now we invite you to join us by taking to the streets at a protest near you on Feb 11.

You signed the petition against ACTA, now check out the amazing map below showing the global day of action, and grab a friend to join a protest and make your voice heard:
https://www.accessnow.org/acta-protest
If you can’t make a protest, you can still participate. Go to our Tumblr page and show your solidarity with the Feb. 11 protestors by submitting a picture, words of support, or protest signs! Your pictures and words will be posted on our page, and the best signs will be printed out by us and given to protestors on Feb. 11.

http://accessnow.tumblr.com/
As you know, the internet is facing many threats and in 2012 Access will ask for your help on those issues. This is the year to protect the internet, and it starts with all of us! We're right in the center of the fight for digital freedom in 2012 and we're happy to have you with us.
The internet has been used for activism. Now it’s time to use activism to save the internet.

***everyone, please feel free to post this on your own journal, Facebook, wherever!***
tilmon: (Default)
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] cestlavieminako at European LJ folks, take note of areas where you can protest ACTA on the 11th!
With an incredible showing of power and belief, over 300,000 people in 72 hours called on the European Parliament to reject the rights-threatening international copyright treaty, ACTA. We’ve shone a bright light on the countries that signed this secretly negotiated agreement – but the fight to save the internet is far from over.
ACTA still needs to be approved by the European Parliament, and if it goes down there, the agreement will effectively be dead in the water. Now we invite you to join us by taking to the streets at a protest near you on Feb 11.

You signed the petition against ACTA, now check out the amazing map below showing the global day of action, and grab a friend to join a protest and make your voice heard:
https://www.accessnow.org/acta-protest
If you can’t make a protest, you can still participate. Go to our Tumblr page and show your solidarity with the Feb. 11 protestors by submitting a picture, words of support, or protest signs! Your pictures and words will be posted on our page, and the best signs will be printed out by us and given to protestors on Feb. 11.

http://accessnow.tumblr.com/
As you know, the internet is facing many threats and in 2012 Access will ask for your help on those issues. This is the year to protect the internet, and it starts with all of us! We're right in the center of the fight for digital freedom in 2012 and we're happy to have you with us.
The internet has been used for activism. Now it’s time to use activism to save the internet.

***everyone, please feel free to post this on your own journal, Facebook, wherever!***
tilmon: (Default)
Rebecca McKinnon over at Slate.com wrote a great article regarding internet freedom. She doesn't really have to convince me that freedom of information exchange and constraints on the powerful interest are important for basic human rights, but she does a great job explaining why.

"As with power in the physical world, power in the digital world must be constrained, balanced, and held accountable. The time has come to assert our rights within the digital spaces we now inhabit—just as people around the globe have fought for their rights in the physical spaces once controlled entirely by sovereigns who claimed to have the divine right to rule as they pleased.

We must stop thinking of ourselves as “users” of the Internet and instead act like citizens of the digital networks we inhabit, or “netizens.” If existing institutions and mechanisms are inadequate to constrain the abuse of power across globally interconnected digital networks, political innovation must catch up to technological innovation.

Democracy was never advanced by people asking politely. Building and preserving democracy in the physical world remains a constant struggle. Conceiving and implementing new forms of governance for a globally interconnected digital world—based on the notion of consent of the networked—is not going to be any easier"
tilmon: (Default)
Rebecca McKinnon over at Slate.com wrote a great article regarding internet freedom. She doesn't really have to convince me that freedom of information exchange and constraints on the powerful interest are important for basic human rights, but she does a great job explaining why.

"As with power in the physical world, power in the digital world must be constrained, balanced, and held accountable. The time has come to assert our rights within the digital spaces we now inhabit—just as people around the globe have fought for their rights in the physical spaces once controlled entirely by sovereigns who claimed to have the divine right to rule as they pleased.

We must stop thinking of ourselves as “users” of the Internet and instead act like citizens of the digital networks we inhabit, or “netizens.” If existing institutions and mechanisms are inadequate to constrain the abuse of power across globally interconnected digital networks, political innovation must catch up to technological innovation.

Democracy was never advanced by people asking politely. Building and preserving democracy in the physical world remains a constant struggle. Conceiving and implementing new forms of governance for a globally interconnected digital world—based on the notion of consent of the networked—is not going to be any easier"
tilmon: (Default)
The fight to save the internet is in your hands now. We all need you to fight the European ratification of ACTA. Please click through to this website, and take action today. Stop ACTA banner

tilmon: (Default)
The fight to save the internet is in your hands now. We all need you to fight the European ratification of ACTA. Please click through to this website, and take action today. Stop ACTA banner

tilmon: (Default)
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] cantarina1 at post
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] electricdruid at The fiasco continues

ACTA in a Nutshell –

What is ACTA?  ACTA is the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement. A new intellectual property enforcement treaty being negotiated by the United States, the European Community, Switzerland, and Japan, with Australia, the Republic of Korea, New Zealand, Mexico, Jordan, Morocco, Singapore, the United Arab Emirates, and Canada recently announcing that they will join in as well.

Why should you care about ACTA? Initial reports indicate that the treaty will have a very broad scope and will involve new tools targeting “Internet distribution and information technology.”

What is the goal of ACTA? Reportedly the goal is to create new legal standards of intellectual property enforcement, as well as increased international cooperation, an example of which would be an increase in information sharing between signatory countries’ law enforcement agencies.

Essential ACTA Resources

  • Read more about ACTA here: ACTA Fact Sheet
  • Read the authentic version of the ACTA text as of 15 April 2011, as finalized by participating countries here: ACTA Finalized Text
  • Follow the history of the treaty’s formation here: ACTA history
  • Read letters from U.S. Senator Ron Wyden wherein he challenges the constitutionality of ACTA: Letter 1 | Letter 2 | Read the Administration’s Response to Wyden’s First Letter here: Response
  • Watch a short informative video on ACTA: ACTA Video
  • Watch a lulzy video on ACTA: Lulzy Video

Say NO to ACTA. It is essential to spread awareness and get the word out on ACTA.

Via Tumblr



This entry was also posted at http://cantarina.dreamwidth.org/131889.html. (comments: comment count unavailable)
tilmon: (Default)
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] cantarina1 at post
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] electricdruid at The fiasco continues

ACTA in a Nutshell –

What is ACTA?  ACTA is the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement. A new intellectual property enforcement treaty being negotiated by the United States, the European Community, Switzerland, and Japan, with Australia, the Republic of Korea, New Zealand, Mexico, Jordan, Morocco, Singapore, the United Arab Emirates, and Canada recently announcing that they will join in as well.

Why should you care about ACTA? Initial reports indicate that the treaty will have a very broad scope and will involve new tools targeting “Internet distribution and information technology.”

What is the goal of ACTA? Reportedly the goal is to create new legal standards of intellectual property enforcement, as well as increased international cooperation, an example of which would be an increase in information sharing between signatory countries’ law enforcement agencies.

Essential ACTA Resources

  • Read more about ACTA here: ACTA Fact Sheet
  • Read the authentic version of the ACTA text as of 15 April 2011, as finalized by participating countries here: ACTA Finalized Text
  • Follow the history of the treaty’s formation here: ACTA history
  • Read letters from U.S. Senator Ron Wyden wherein he challenges the constitutionality of ACTA: Letter 1 | Letter 2 | Read the Administration’s Response to Wyden’s First Letter here: Response
  • Watch a short informative video on ACTA: ACTA Video
  • Watch a lulzy video on ACTA: Lulzy Video

Say NO to ACTA. It is essential to spread awareness and get the word out on ACTA.

Via Tumblr



This entry was also posted at http://cantarina.dreamwidth.org/131889.html. (comments: comment count unavailable)

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